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mbravo 12 September 2016 07:41 PM

A stale horse is one that didn't get stored properly and absorbed moisture from the air.

thorny locust 12 September 2016 07:48 PM

I think if I'd heard "riding a stale horse" I'd have taken it as metaphorical, in the same sort of sense as "riding a hobbyhorse" or "beating a dead horse"; and thought the singer was saying he'd been doing the same thing way too long.

GenYus234 12 September 2016 07:52 PM

"On a stale horse I ride" is far from the most ridiculous song lines, much less ridiculous than expecting chairs to talk.

Seaboe Muffinchucker 12 September 2016 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey (Post 1928267)
Wikipedia says that 'strong flour' has a higher gluten content.

Which one is pastry flour?

I'm aware of all-purpose, enriched and pastry. I know there's one with extra gluten (my sister used it years and years ago when she used to bake bread) but I don't know what it's called, and I'm not sure our 'enriched' is the same as their 'enriched'.

I never knew that 'sponge' merely meant cake until this show, either.

Seaboe

KirkMcD 12 September 2016 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker (Post 1928318)
Which one is pastry flour?

Low protein (gluten), Higher starch.
More protein than Cake Flour though.

Quote:

I know there's one with extra gluten (my sister used it years and years ago when she used to bake bread) but I don't know what it's called
It's usually called Bread Flour.


In terms of strength, from low protein to high, it's
Cake,
Pastry,
All Purpose,
Bread,
Whole wheat.

thorny locust 12 September 2016 11:27 PM

I know of:


bleached white

unbleached white (bran removed but not additionally bleached)

both of those also usually enriched white (nutrients added)

"all purpose", which is usually enriched white flour of a medium grind with some additional stuff in it supposed to improve baking quality, but seems to vary with brand

white pastry flour (finer grind)

whole wheat

whole wheat high gluten bread flour

whole wheat pastry flour (finer grind)

and then of course there's rye flour, cornmeal of various grinds, and a whole lot of other things one can make flour out of -- buckwheat and soy, for instance.

Seaboe Muffinchucker 13 September 2016 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thorny locust (Post 1928353)
and then of course there's rye flour, cornmeal of various grinds, and a whole lot of other things one can make flour out of -- buckwheat and soy, for instance.

I was trying not to go there. :lol:

You can substitute whole wheat pastry flour one-to-one with white all-purpose flour without needing to add extra fluids, which is the main reason I know about pastry flour (I use 1/2 & 1/2 white and wheat in most of my baking).

Seaboe

quink 13 September 2016 05:20 PM

I remember seeing this wedding video circulating around Facebook a few years ago and thinking it was cute and really well done. I vaguely remember someone mentioning that the groom was in theatre.

To Life: Vanessa's Wedding Surprise

This morning, Lin-Manuel Miranda tweeted a picture from his wedding, and now being able to pull off a full musical production at a reception makes a lot more sense. That group could probably use Tony awards as centrepieces now.

(TL;DR - Saw viral wedding video years ago with comments that the groom could be on Broadway, found out this morning that the groom was actually the guy who currently owns Broadway)

Sue 13 September 2016 05:25 PM

I "recently figured out" who he was before Hamilton got big (or at least before I knew about it) when I saw a really cute Sesame Street segment where he played a real estate agent helping Big Bird find a new habitat. It was one of those "I know him from somewhere" moments and I checked for his name in the credits and then thanks to the magic of google was able to connect to a story about the wedding video.

musicgeek 13 September 2016 08:05 PM

I knew of Miranda from reading/hearing about "In the Heights" (although I hadn't seen or heard it), but what made me take notice was a 14-minute musical he crafted for a segment on NPR's "This American Life." If you haven't heard or seen it, it's worth checking out:

21 Chump Street

(The whole thing used to be available online, but I can't find it now - there are some high school productions posted in their entirety.)

Oh, and GenYus, Dave Barry concurs:

Quote:

In a recent column I noted that certain songs are always getting played on the radio, despite the fact that these songs have been shown, in scientific laboratory tests, to be bad. One example I cited was Neil Diamond's ballad "I Am, I Said," in which Neil complains repeatedly that nobody hears him, "not even the chair." I pointed out that this does not make a ton of sense, unless Neil has unusually intelligent furniture. ("Mr. Diamond, your Barcalounger is on line two.")

Well, it turns out there are some major Neil Diamond fans out there in Readerland. They sent me a large pile of hostile mail with mouth froth spewing out of the envelope seams. In the interest of journalistic fairness, I will summarize their main arguments here:

"Dear Pukenose:

"Just who the hell do you think you are to blah blah a great artist like Neil blah blah more than 20 gold records blah blah how many gold records do YOU have, you scumsucking wad of blah blah I personally have attended 1,794 of Neil's concerts blah blah What about 'Love on the Rocks?' Huh? What about 'Cracklin' Rosie?' blah blah if you had ONE-TENTH of Neil's talent blah blah so I listened to 'Heart Light' 40 times in a row and the next day the cyst was GONE and the doctor said he had never seen such a rapid blah blah What about 'Play Me?' What About 'Song Sung' Blah? Cancel my subscription, if I have one."

WildaBeast 13 September 2016 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by musicgeek (Post 1928442)
what made me take notice was a 14-minute musical he crafted for a segment on NPR's "This American Life."

Nitpick: Public radio != NPR. This American Life is produced by WBEZ and used to be distributed by PRI and is now distributed by PRX. They have no affiliation with NPR other than the fact that the show airs on the same stations as NPR programs, and IIRC Ira Glass got his start in radio as a reporter on All Things Considered.

GenYus234 13 September 2016 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by musicgeek (Post 1928442)
Oh, and GenYus, Dave Barry concurs:

That's where I got that as an example of a dumb lyric. Another contender that came too late for that contest is Oasis' "Champagne Supernova"

"Slowly walking down the hall, faster than a cannonball."

musicgeek 14 September 2016 03:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WildaBeast (Post 1928447)
Nitpick: Public radio != NPR. This American Life is produced by WBEZ and used to be distributed by PRI and is now distributed by PRX. They have no affiliation with NPR other than the fact that the show airs on the same stations as NPR programs, and IIRC Ira Glass got his start in radio as a reporter on All Things Considered.

You're right, but for me, this is somewhat like the people who get angry about the inclusion of Pixar movies in discussions of Disney films. Yes, they're produced by different studios, but they do very little to separate them in the public eye.

According to their own website, This American Life partnered with NPR News to create the Planet Money blog and podcast. Ira Glass is a regular feature of NPR's pledge drives, and is still seen as an "NPR personality." This American Life and other non-NPR shows (such as Prairie Home Companion) wind up making lots of cross-reference in jokes with actual NPR-produced shows (Car Talk, Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me, etc.), such that they seem to portray themselves as one big public radio family, of which NPR is often perceived as the flagship.

/[feeble petulant defense of my own mistake] :p

Eoin 14 September 2016 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker (Post 1928318)
I never knew that 'sponge' merely meant cake until this show, either.

Seaboe

I've never watched The Great British Bake-Off, but a quick look-up of the word "sponge" suggests this is a British shortening of "sponge cake". It's rather confusing for a baking show to not specify "sponge cake", since sponge can also mean the starter used in breads like brioche and ciabatta.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sponge_and_dough

Gutter Monkey 14 September 2016 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GenYus234 (Post 1928452)
That's where I got that as an example of a dumb lyric. Another contender that came too late for that contest is Oasis' "Champagne Supernova"

"Slowly walking down the hall, faster than a cannonball."

Cannonballs are known for not walking very fast, or at all. :lol:


Quote:

Originally Posted by Eoin (Post 1928479)
I've never watched The Great British Bake-Off
...
It's rather confusing for a baking show to not specify "sponge cake"

Oh I love the "I've never seen the show but I think they were wrong" argument. Please tell us more about what you think this show you haven't seen got wrong. :p

I've watched roughly four seasons of the show and I don't recall anyone ever being confused over their use of the word 'sponge', especially since they almost always talk about sponge on the cake episodes and not the bread episodes.

Alarm 14 September 2016 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GenYus234 (Post 1928452)
That's where I got that as an example of a dumb lyric. Another contender that came too late for that contest is Oasis' "Champagne Supernova"

"Slowly walking down the hall, faster than a cannonball."

You don't know at what speed he usually walks down the hall.
Maybe going faster than a cannonball is him taking the time to slow down.
:fish:

Lainie 14 September 2016 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eoin (Post 1928479)
It's rather confusing for a baking show to not specify "sponge cake", since sponge can also mean the starter used in breads like brioche and ciabatta.

It's clear from context, because they're talking about a dessert.

Lainie 14 September 2016 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey (Post 1928487)
Oh I love the "I've never seen the show but I think they were wrong" argument. Please tell us more about what you think this show you haven't seen got wrong. :p

It was my impression that Eoin thought you got something wrong about the show, not that the show was using the term wrong. :p

Seaboe Muffinchucker 14 September 2016 03:25 PM

On GBBO, when they talk about sponge, it's always in the context of cake, and usually more specific than just "sponge" (they talk about two different kinds and I have no clue which is which and what the differences are).

The show gathers very experienced and knowledgeable amateur bakers and, basically, helps them raise their game to the professional level. It's a wonderful reality show that emphasizes cooperation, skill and imagination, and the prize at the end is a cake stand.

Seaboe

Richard W 14 September 2016 06:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seaboe Muffinchucker (Post 1928525)
On GBBO, when they talk about sponge, it's always in the context of cake, and usually more specific than just "sponge" (they talk about two different kinds and I have no clue which is which and what the differences are).

I've never watched Bake Off either (and now that it's no longer going to be on the BBC because the producers sold it to Channel 4 for a price the BBC couldn't afford, I never will watch it, in protest, even though I never watched it before), but one of the types of sponge is probably a Victoria sponge, which is richer than an ordinary sponge. I can't remember the exact difference from when we were taught to make sponge cakes at school, but apparently it's got more fat in. So that's probably what they're talking about, and if not, they've got it wrong.


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