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-   -   First world problems (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=93462)

Not_Done_Living 05 February 2016 03:38 AM

First world problems
 
hope i am doing this right cause .. well the old thre hit 999 posts!

anyway -- my FWP -- our cleaning lady who had to take the last three weeks off because her husband went to brazil and she had to stay home jsut in case he got in trouble, broke her arm this weekend ...and it will be another 6 weeks before she can come back...

starting to wonder if we need a cleaning lady now.. the money we are saving is pretty nice..

WildaBeast 05 February 2016 03:58 AM

I share my Netflix account with my sister. When Netflix first started supporting profiles for different users on the same account I created a profile for her. It was great as long as we both had Google TV devices; it kept her list and everything separate from mine. Then she bought a Roku, because some of the other streaming services she used are no longer supported on Google TV. Netflix doesn't support profiles on Roku, so when she watches Netflix on her Roku all the stuff she watches ends up on my "continue watching" list.

Not_Done_Living 05 February 2016 02:15 PM

i know the pain .. every device in our house supports profiles -- except the one in the 9 year olds room ( a roku 2) -- and her shows spill over into my profile .... so i get this odd mix of dystopian sci fi and tween dramas...

A Turtle Named Mack 05 February 2016 03:04 PM

But really, is there anything more dystopian than the drama of tweens?

WildaBeast 06 February 2016 12:04 AM

Yahoo Mail moved the delete button in their web interface and put a new "archive" in its place. Now the delete button moved two spaces to the right. So of course I keep hitting archive when I really do just want to delete something. No, I really don't need to archive that email from Redbox with the now expired coupon code.

Cervus 06 February 2016 02:45 AM

I found a beautiful nightstand on Craigslist that I can pick up tomorrow, if only the seller would respond to me. I contacted her 7 hours after she posted the listing, so I hope it wasn't already sold in that short time frame.

Mouse 07 February 2016 01:03 AM

I keep trying to learn about birds, but bird books have large pictures of them all perfectly still, which doesn't do me much good because birds in real life hop around and fly instead of staying perfectly still so I can ID them. Ugh..didn't nature get the memo that she exists to serve me? ;)

kitap 07 February 2016 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mouse (Post 1905982)
I keep trying to learn about birds, but bird books have large pictures of them all perfectly still, which doesn't do me much good because birds in real life hop around and fly instead of staying perfectly still so I can ID them. Ugh..didn't nature get the memo that she exists to serve me? ;)

I am terrible at IDing birds; my dad will never let me forget that I once described a bird as "little and brown" while he was flipping through some bird guide or other. So it came as a huge surprise that birdwatching with people who really can ID birds flying past them (this impressed me no end) is actually fun.

Gutter Monkey 07 February 2016 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mouse (Post 1905982)
I keep trying to learn about birds, but bird books have large pictures of them all perfectly still, which doesn't do me much good because birds in real life hop around and fly instead of staying perfectly still so I can ID them. Ugh..didn't nature get the memo that she exists to serve me? ;)

Have you tried shooting the birds? Dead birds are pretty well known for staying still.
#Lifehacks

Die Capacitrix 07 February 2016 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kitap (Post 1906000)
I am terrible at IDing birds; my dad will never let me forget that I once described a bird as "little and brown" while he was flipping through some bird guide or other. So it came as a huge surprise that birdwatching with people who really can ID birds flying past them (this impressed me no end) is actually fun.

My mother's friend, an avid bird-watcher, once identified a bird as an "LBT". When pressed, she admitted it stood for "Little Brown Thing". So even the serious ones don't always know everything.

kitap 07 February 2016 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix (Post 1906006)
My mother's friend, an avid bird-watcher, once identified a bird as an "LBT". When pressed, she admitted it stood for "Little Brown Thing". So even the serious ones don't always know everything.

Oh, I imagine so; lots of little birds look alike. The guide I meant though? Seriously impressive. We stopped off on our tour of Panama for a half hour or so of bird-watching and some bird flew past. "It's a ruby-breasted tongue strangling flipper flyer!"* The ornithology student (hired by the tour company) said. It landed on a branch and the bird watchers in the group all hurridly looked it up and it was indeed a ruby-breasted tongue strangling flipper flyer. I would have gone with "something flying; possibly a bird".

* name may not be 100% accurate.

A Turtle Named Mack 07 February 2016 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gutter Monkey (Post 1906004)
Have you tried shooting the birds? Dead birds are pretty well known for staying still.
#Lifehacks

People are often shocked to learn that this is how John James Audubon was able to make his careful drawings. Of course, when he was studying N. American birds, there was no population pressure the way many species have now. Birds don't often display their plumage the way he shows many of them, but he needed to show all the identifying marks. Often identifying specific species from others depends on a glimpse during fight or landing or dust baths. And actually for many species the only way you are likely to ever identify them is if you know the call, but Audubon could not preserve that.

Gutter Monkey 07 February 2016 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by A Turtle Named Mack (Post 1906011)
People are often shocked to learn that this is how John James Audubon was able to make his careful drawings. Of course, when he was studying N. American birds, there was no population pressure the way many species have now.

People are still being shocked by the fact that field biologists 'collect' specimens:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...saving-species

Sue 07 February 2016 05:31 PM

Between my Dad, my husband, my kids, their spouses and myself we've probably purchased at least 40 Tim Horton's coffees since they launched their annual "roll up the rim to win" event. So far none of us have won anything. I get that it's random chance but honestly! Most years I win a free coffee or donut at least one out of every three cups. I don't really expect to win a car or any of the other big prizes but not even winning a coffee - I may just take my business elsewhere. That'll teach ya, Timmies :lol:.

Cervus 07 February 2016 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mouse (Post 1905982)
I keep trying to learn about birds, but bird books have large pictures of them all perfectly still, which doesn't do me much good because birds in real life hop around and fly instead of staying perfectly still so I can ID them. Ugh..didn't nature get the memo that she exists to serve me? ;)

Your local Audubon society should have free field trips that are open to the public; check their website. The best way to learn to ID birds is to learn their movements, their calls, their migration patterns, and their preferred habitats and food sources. Some species have a distinct way of bobbing their tails, others might bob their heads or wag their tails in a certain way when they're foraging. Knowing these distinctive movements can make it easy to ID similar-looking or fast-moving species.

So it's best, when you're new to birding, to join field trips and talk to other birders and wildlife photographers. Ask them for help IDing species; I've never known anyone who didn't help a complete stranger who wanted to know "What bird is that?" and "How can you tell it apart from the others?"

And don't feel bad; I studied ornithology and I was required to learn hundreds of bird IDs for my classes. It can be tough; I've been a birder for 10 years, and I still can't ID certain shorebirds or gulls who aren't in breeding plumage.

(I learned the term LBJs [little brown jobs] to describe difficult sparrows; unidentifiable shorebirds are "peeps", and it's not uncommon for birders to write "Duck sp." on their list to indicate that they saw some ducks but couldn't ID them to genus level, let alone species.)

Don Enrico 08 February 2016 07:18 AM

I'm still waiting for a bird watching guide that has pictures of all species of birds of prey as an in-flight silhouette.

A Turtle Named Mack 08 February 2016 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Enrico (Post 1906078)
I'm still waiting for a bird watching guide that has pictures of all species of birds of prey as an in-flight silhouette.

Try the Peterson Field Guides. They are very affordable. I don't have mine handy, but I recall that for many birds they have in-flight as well as perching depictions. For several allied species, they will have silhouettes-from-underneath for comparison. Still, telling a red-tailed hawk from a broad-shouldered hawk from 1/2 kilometer or more underneath is for the experts. And speaking of experts:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cervus (Post 1906030)
And don't feel bad; I studied ornithology and I was required to learn hundreds of bird IDs for my classes. It can be tough; I've been a birder for 10 years, and I still can't ID certain shorebirds or gulls who aren't in breeding plumage.

Oh, yeah, Ms. Smarty-pants, how do you tell all the varieties of warblers apart!?

Seaboe Muffinchucker 08 February 2016 02:28 PM

My kitchen lights turn themselves off. Okay, I can see some people wondering how that's a problem, and why it's a first world problem. It's a problem because they'll only stay on for 15 minutes to 1/2 hour. It's an FWP because the cause is connected to the transformer (don't know quite what it is, yet).

Seaboe

A Turtle Named Mack 08 February 2016 03:16 PM

SM, that would concern me greatly if it is not a thing with a built-in timer. That sounds like for some reason the circuit is getting overloaded. Besides the annoyance, both in losing light and concern over whether other things are getting cut off as well, it sounds like a potential fire hazard. What do you have to do to get the lights back on - just flip the switch at the wall or go to the circuit breaker board? Or do they come on themselves after a bit?

Richard W 08 February 2016 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Die Capacitrix (Post 1906006)
My mother's friend, an avid bird-watcher, once identified a bird as an "LBT". When pressed, she admitted it stood for "Little Brown Thing". So even the serious ones don't always know everything.

I was going to say, I've heard it as "LBJ" for "Little Brown Job" but it's a well-known birdwatching term!

(eta)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Enrico (Post 1906078)
I'm still waiting for a bird watching guide that has pictures of all species of birds of prey as an in-flight silhouette.

The Hamlyn Guide to Birds of Britain and Europe has a page of silhouettes comparing each broad type (since falcons, for example, would all look similar) and then each species has a view showing them in flight straight from below, which you could easily imagine as a silhouette just by ignoring the colours. There are head-on views too. I don't know if it's available in German, but I shouldn't think that would matter since you could always cross-reference the Latin names with another book if you weren't sure of the species...


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