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-   -   Code to remove coins from vending machines (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=69039)

Jenn 30 December 2010 08:04 PM

Code to remove coins from vending machines
 
Comment: Not sure if it works or not. Not comfortable testing it when it is not an emergency

http://www.snopes.com/photos/crime/graphics/vending.jpg

snopes 30 December 2010 08:06 PM

Unfortunately, Step #4 is: "The previous steps don't actually work, so you'll have to find some other means of stealing money."

GenYus234 30 December 2010 08:14 PM

Everyone knows that the code to get free coins from a vending machine is up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A.

rujasu 30 December 2010 08:21 PM

Indeed. The real challenge is finding the secret Nintendo controller in the machine, and accessing it before security tracks you down.

STF 30 December 2010 08:37 PM

I prefer Down, Up, Left, Left, A, Right, Down

Anyone recognize that code?

GenYus234 30 December 2010 09:08 PM

Is that the Contra code?

STF 30 December 2010 09:18 PM

No,it's not. I'll put the answer in white text, right here: It's the "gore code" from Mortal Kombat. You remember it because it spells DULLARD. End White Text.

On-topic, I thought about this after I read this. I wonder if these machines have any sort of code like that at all. I'd assume not because my understanding is that you use a physical key to open them. I don't know what benefit their would be for putting a code that could be obtained by the public in these machines.

I know someone who handed their key over to an Coke employee at a school. Turns out the guy had a uniform, but didn't work for Coke at all and he made off with all the money in the machine.

Silas Sparkhammer 30 December 2010 09:34 PM

Well, I do know from first-hand experience that SOME publicly operated devices have "secret" codes that put them into maintenance mode, which allows them to be opened for purposes of re-stocking expendable supplies (e.g., a roll of paper to the printer for printing receipts.) Pretty obvious, really.

But from observing the guys filling Coke machines....they have a physical key.

Silas

Melissa 31 December 2010 03:40 AM

I'm not sure if it's intentional or not, but the OP graphic reminds me of the Underpants Gnomes' business plan from South Park:
http://www.blindfiveyearold.com/wp-c...nts-gnomes.png

Mateus 31 December 2010 05:18 AM

It is. It's also a long-used meme on 4Chan.

And speaking of 4Chan, I've seen quite a few similar info posts like these on the site, which makes me think that they're more along the lines of troll-calls rather than actual maintenance modes.

But I'll head down to the bus station tomorrow and try it out.

kitap 31 December 2010 07:29 AM

Step 4 reminds me of that old Sydney Harris cartoon with the one fellow reading the other fellow's formula on the chalkboard and the first fellow says "I think you might want to be more explicit in Step 2". Step two says "And then a miracle occurs".

ganzfeld 31 December 2010 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by STF (Post 1378480)
I prefer Down, Up, Left, Left, A, Right, Down

Anyone recognize that code?

sFB Easter egg that made colorful bubbles. Oh that was GenYus's

overyonder 31 December 2010 08:06 PM

I have a Pepsi machine in my garage (for sodas and "adult" beverages). Yes, it has a key, which allows access to all of the innards.

There are 2 (3 with the bill changer) where the money is held:

1) The coin changer. This holds nickels-dimes and quarters to make change when a purchase is made. Generally this coin changer is filled by the operator as needed (e.g.: if the machine has seen a lot of bills). It *sometimes* is refilled by the coins going in and has a limited capacity with sensors built in.

2) The coin hopper. This holds the coins that are used by buyers to purchase the products. If the coins don't go in the coin changer to replenish the change, they go in the hopper. The hopper can ONLY be emptied by opening the machine with the key.

3) The bill acceptor. This receives the dollar bills, and stacks em neatly. They are only removable by the operator, when the machine has been opened (by the key).

The coin changer can be set in "test" mode to drop/empty the stacks of change, however I've only seen a switch that is INSIDE the machine to activate that mode.

That being said, the "punching of buttons" in a pattern DOES serve a purpose, which is to set the price of the product. This is done while the door is opened and the service/programming switch has been turned on.

If there was a "secret" code to get money out, the only money that would indeed come out would be the money from the coin changer. This holds about $25 +/- in the machine I have.

OY

TrishDaDish 03 January 2011 01:41 PM

Quote:

I have a Pepsi machine in my garage
Well, no wonder it doesn't work! The OP is about Coke machines!

diddy 03 January 2011 02:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kitap (Post 1378791)
Step 4 reminds me of that old Sydney Harris cartoon with the one fellow reading the other fellow's formula on the chalkboard and the first fellow says "I think you might want to be more explicit in Step 2". Step two says "And then a miracle occurs".

I have seen that as a Far Side cartoon.

Troberg 03 January 2011 07:13 PM

Obviously fake if you have seen the coin mechanism. Coin mechanisms are pretty standardized (not a formal standard, but they are pretty interchangable). Basically, it's just a device that checks the size and sometimes the weight of the coin, then dumps it into a container. Depending on machine, this container may be built into the construction or just a random container put there. In my pinball machine, I use a plastic cookie box. The point is that once the coin pass the check and drops into the container, it's there and it can't go back out by non-manual means.

There are maintenance modes. Some are accessible from the front (often by pressing several buttons on startup), but these usually just gives status info. For more advanced modes, you need to open them and push buttons on an internal panel.

There are also occasional bugs. On the coffee machine when I went to university, if you pressed the button for ordinary coffee repeatedly fast enough, something went wrong and it went into a selftest and gave you a free cup of coffee. I suspect that it happened if one managed to get a click in before it had finished processing the previous click. It only worked on ordinary coffee, though, not on chocolate, so I seldom used it.

Casey 03 January 2011 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mateus (Post 1378755)
It is. It's also a long-used meme on 4Chan.

It is a 4chan diagram. Look in the corner- a mention of Anonymous.

Swordmaster 04 January 2011 12:10 AM

And the clover leaves.

overyonder 04 January 2011 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troberg (Post 1380741)
Basically, it's just a device that checks the size and sometimes the weight of the coin, then dumps it into a container. Depending on machine, this container may be built into the construction or just a random container put there. In my pinball machine, I use a plastic cookie box. The point is that once the coin pass the check and drops into the container, it's there and it can't go back out by non-manual means.

If you read my post above, what you said is inaccurate. The newer soda machines sort the coins and will stack them properly in the change making device, and those coins will be used when buying with a dollar bill (or with a higher amount than the price of the soda). However, when the change making device is filled, the new coins go to the hopper and can't be accessed (that part is like a pinball machine).

OY

Fatman 04 January 2011 04:47 PM

There is a similar code, 4231,IIRC that allows access to certain information, such as number of cokes sold in each slot, amount of change, by each coin. ( which is inaccurate, since it is so rarely reset), but that is all it allowed, read only inofrmation


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