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-   -   The Parking Ticket Awards (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=13141)

snopes 25 July 2007 04:05 PM

The Parking Ticket Awards
 
Quote:

As he was stretchered off with serious leg injuries into the ambulance, his crumpled scooter was being given a 100 parking ticket by a traffic warden - who simply strolled away without even glancing at her hapless victim.

That tale would get a nod in empathy from retired blacksmith Robert McFarland of Skipton, North Yorkshire, whose horse Charlie Boy got a ticket stuck to his nose (under the heading "vehicle description" the traffic warden scribbled "brown horse").

advertisementAs it would from pet-shop owner Cliff Chamberlain from Eccles in Manchester, who was unloading his van and left a rabbit called Bugsy in its hutch outside the shop. Bugsy copped the fine.

Bus driver Chris O'Mahony would also raise a wry smile when hearing these yarns. He was given a ticket for bringing the number 77 Manchester to Moston service to a halt at a, er, bus stop.

The traffic warden simply joined the queue of embarking passengers, hopped on board and proudly handed over a sample of his best work.

While these tales all seem to have a touch of the urban myth about them, they are (apparently) absolutely true.

They are recounted in The Parking Ticket Awards, a collection of stories unearthed by parking campaigner Barrie Segal which will be published as a book.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/mai.../cclife123.xml

Stoneage Dinosaur 25 July 2007 04:18 PM

All but one seem to be genuine, although each ticket was rescinded on appeal.

Parking attendent 'books bunny' looks as if the ticket in this instance was actually issued to a delivery van rather than a rabbit hutch, and the owner was just trying to get out of paying it.

diddy 25 July 2007 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stoneage Dinosaur (Post 261299)
All but one seem to be genuine, although each was rescinded on appeal.

I would be surprised if any of them were upheld upon review.

Meka 25 July 2007 09:55 PM

The one about the bus reminds me of a story I heard about an ambulance (with patient aboard) being ticketed for parking in the ambulance bay of a local hospital.

Towknie 25 July 2007 10:02 PM

I got one in San Diego because my residential parking permit was "improperly affixed" to my vehicle. I took photos of all the other cars on the street and asked the arbitrator what exactly defined "properly affixed", since there seemed to be no rhyme or reason to the other cars on the street, who hadn't received tickets.

The offical verdict was "The ticket was properly issued, but in the interest of justice, and uniformity of enforcement, I'm going to dismiss the ticket."

Arts Myth 01 August 2007 07:35 PM

An interesting note on the OP's website:
Quote:

STOP PRESS: A SUBSTANTIAL NUMBER OF PARKING ATTENDANTS EMPLOYED BY HACKNEY COUNCIL'S CONTRACTORS HAVE BEEN FIRED FOR DISHONESTY. EVERYONE SHOULD THEREFORE APPEAL EVERY HACKNEY PARKING TICKET ISSUED TO SEE WHETHER THEY WERE ISSUED BY ANY OF THESE DISHONEST PARKING ATTENDANTS!
Can't think of a more likely place to find hackneyed ticketing practices...

lazerus the duck 01 August 2007 08:16 PM

Quote:

Bus driver Chris O'Mahony would also raise a wry smile when hearing these yarns. He was given a ticket for bringing the number 77 Manchester to Moston service to a halt at a, er, bus stop.
I wonder if there was suitable extenuating circumstances for this one. I've been on a bus several times while the bus driver stopped got out and went to get fags or a paper from the nearest newsagent.
I could see a very good reason for ticketing someone in these circumstances as he is then physically parked rather than just stopping at the stop.

kanazawa 01 August 2007 09:57 PM

My favorite parking ticket story happened when I first started college. I came up with a friend from high school to give him a tour of the campus. As we were walking through the parking lot, a university cop, who appeared to be leaning on the back side of a car yelled out, "You two, get over here..."

We were like WTF?...but of course went over. He says, "OK, you two hold this car, I'm going to try to push down the window", which was open a couple of inches.

Apparently, someone had parked and forget to set the parking brake, and it was rolling down the slight incline. He then got in, and ordered up to push the car--into a handicapped spot, where he then wrote the appropriate ticket (several hundred dollars, of course).

I've always wondered how that one held up in court...

Eddylizard 01 August 2007 10:31 PM

Does wheel clamping count?

quiltsbypam 02 August 2007 07:46 PM

I think I've told this story before, but several years ago when I was a part-time student at Syracuse University, I went up the hill to buy textbooks. Parking is notoriously difficult on the hill and I was delighted to find a spot at a parking meter. I put some coins in, bought my books and, when I got back to my car, found a parking ticket. The time on the meter had not run out. However, the meter was in a no-parking zone. I didn't notice the signs -- I just figured a meter meant it was fair game. That really torqued me!

Griffin2020 02 August 2007 09:41 PM

I would have to say that having a meter in a no-parking zone would be an attractive nuisance, and should be thrown out of court.

Skeptic 02 August 2007 09:55 PM

Several years ago, a UK fighter plane landed with faulty brakes and went through the fence at the end of the runway onto a road. (No-one injured). But for a laugh, a parking warden gave it a ticket, and got in trouble for his action.

Didn't Jeremy Beadle, or one of those other practical joke shows, wait for a victim to park and then put in a realistic parking meter beside their car with a real looking ticket attached to their windscreen.

Andrew of Ware 03 August 2007 08:24 AM

In April in Ware a Securicor guard had a cash box snatched from him. The guard was delivering the cash to a bank in Ware and as he was being interviewed by police his van was given a parking ticket.

WareonLine story about the robbery here.

The site used to have a long distance photograph of the traffic warden awarding the ticket. (As, for Ware, this was a very serious crime the whole of the High Street was cordoned off and it was a right problem getting home in the evening.)

damian 03 August 2007 02:55 PM

My mum was booked 2 months ago for parking in a handicap bay. Mum saw the inspector writing the ticket and politely pointed out that she has a valid permit to park there. The inspector told her she did not look handicapped and continued to write the ticket.

Mum has recently had a hip replacement, and was using a walking stick at the time. She was easily able to have the ticket withdrawn, and received a written apology from the council.

I suggested next time this happens, just claim she has Tourettes and tell the guy to NFBSK off.

Andrew of Ware 03 August 2007 06:46 PM

Breaking news...

The lead story on page one in tonight's esteemed (not) local paper, 'The Hertfordshire Mercury' is about a blind man who was given a parking ticket because his disabled badge was displayed back to front.

Headline and picture here

Dr. Dave 03 August 2007 06:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware (Post 273471)
Breaking news...

The lead story on page one in tonight's esteemed (not) local paper, 'The Hertfordshire Mercury' is about a blind man who was given a parking ticket because his disabled badge was displayed back to front.

Headline and picture here

Hold on a minute. Is this disabled badge the somethng to place on the car's dashboard and/or mirror? If so, presumably someone with adequate vision would have been driving with this man.* And that person should be able to and responsible for placing the badge, no?

*If not :eek:

Doug4.7 03 August 2007 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eddylizard (Post 270409)
Does wheel clamping count?

Wow, that's wild. I didn't know you could legally demand any amount of $$$ (or pounds as the case may be) for parking on private land in the UK.

Andrew of Ware 03 August 2007 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Dave (Post 273499)
Hold on a minute. Is this disabled badge the somethng to place on the car's dashboard and/or mirror? If so, presumably someone with adequate vision would have been driving with this man.* And that person should be able to and responsible for placing the badge, no?

*If not :eek:

In the UK it is possible for some 'registered blind' people to drive (depending on how blind they are, of course). So the blind man may have been the driver and the person responsible for displaying the badge (which would have been on the windscreen, btw).

Of course, if the blind person was the driver and was too blind to see the badge was displayed back to front then indeed ... :eek:

Dr. Dave 03 August 2007 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andrew of Ware (Post 273624)
In the UK it is possible for some 'registered blind' people to drive (depending on how blind they are, of course).

Really? In the U.S. one can have a restriction on the license requiring one to wear glasses or contacts (corrective lenses) when driving but I do not think that that level of vision impairment would qualify for the disabled plates.

How visually impaired can a person be to still be allowed to drive, yet qualify for the badge? Is this really a good idea?

Algae 03 August 2007 08:22 PM

The local director of tourism is well known around here for his parking tickets. The paper just reported he recently had paid off $1440 in fines.

So, we're working at a festival downtown, and someone asks my mom if they're supposed to feed the parking meters on Saturdays. Mom can't remember, sees the Tourism Director and asks him what the parking rules on Saturdays were.

About 5 minutes later, she realized he probably didn't know the answer...


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