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-   -   Why Most of America is Terrible at Making Biscuits (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=97158)

DawnStorm 26 November 2018 03:25 PM

Why Most of America is Terrible at Making Biscuits
 
Interesting Atlantic article: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...giving/576526/

Until I read it, I had no idea that there was soft flour(s) and hard flour(s).

Seaboe Muffinchucker 26 November 2018 04:14 PM

You clearly don't watch GBBO. :lol:

Seaboe (and if you do, you'll know what GBBO stands for).

GenYus234 26 November 2018 04:24 PM

Also called baking/cake flour* (soft) and bread flour (hard). Basically the more gluten, the stretchier and chewier the final product will be. All purpose flour is somewhere in the middle, not that great for either, but good enough for most cooks.

* There is also pastry flour, which has more gluten than cake/baking but less than all-purpose.

Beachlife! 26 November 2018 04:36 PM

So the soft flour that is readily available in the south is the same as cake flour? I had no idea.

iskinner 26 November 2018 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beachlife! (Post 1992004)
So the soft flour that is readily available in the south is the same as cake flour? I had no idea.

Not technically 100% correct. Cake flour is made with soft wheat, but it is specifically milled to be much finer grained than normal flour. But it may be the only soft flour product found in many markets, so it might be all that is available to (g) you.

GenYus234 26 November 2018 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iskinner (Post 1992007)
Not technically 100% correct.

That's the best kind of correct!

erwins 26 November 2018 07:00 PM

Yeah, the professional chef quoted in the article said it could not be had, even through commercial supply chains, in the North. So, cake flour is not the same thing. I make pretty good biscuits, but they are more dense than I'd like. I may have to have someone bring me some flour at Christmas to do a comparison.

On the King Arthur flour site, it says that soft winter wheat is primarily grown east of the Mississippi, in the South. But it mentions that it is also grown in the Pacific Northwest, and in New York. So if the demand grows maybe some additional supplies might pop up.

iskinner 26 November 2018 07:13 PM

Commercial supply chains can be a bit of a different deal, in that they are generally supplying products in larger quantities.

I have been able to find small bags of soft wheat flour here in Sacramento on occasion when I have been willing to look hard enough. As well as specialty cooking retailers, I think some are interested in soft wheat as the lower protein (I.E. gluten) can appeal to a certain market which may help the product spread.

ETA: It should be noted that the author of the original article was looking for a soft wheat self-rising flour product. Not just soft wheat flour. I would be surprised to find much soft wheat with raising agents added outside of the south east at this time. But it is rather trivial to use ones own raising agents in ones baking projects.

ASL 26 November 2018 07:16 PM

I skimmed the article. I get it. These are people who, for some reason, insist on making their own dough from scratch. Still, I keep coming back to, why is this so hard? Seriously, you just pop the can and put the contents on a baking sheet!

https://www.pillsbury.com/-/media/PB...iginal-8ct.jpg

#WhitePeopleProblems

Seaboe Muffinchucker 26 November 2018 07:26 PM

Or there's Bisquick.

Seaboe

Crius of CoH 27 November 2018 02:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ASL (Post 1992017)
I skimmed the article. I get it. These are people who, for some reason, insist on making their own dough from scratch. Still, I keep coming back to, why is this so hard? Seriously, you just pop the can and put the contents on a baking sheet!

https://www.pillsbury.com/-/media/PB...iginal-8ct.jpg

#WhitePeopleProblems

The problem is they don't use the correct temperature, failing to adjust for dark/nonstick pans. THAT'S why America is terrible at making biscuits! Follow the directions, people! :p

ganzfeld 27 November 2018 05:07 AM

Meh, use all purpose, call them scones, and get over it. (Or go with ASL's solution. Unfortunately not available to me.) There's hardly anything simpler to make than biscuits so I don't really see the point in getting fancy about it. As long as they're warm and edible. Also, I don't think most of the US is bad at them at all (and I've been known to be critical of some US foods and beverages).

Dasla 27 November 2018 06:24 AM

I don't make scones often but when I did for Home Economics my teacher complemented me on them. A few years ago I did a tour of western Queensland . There were some members of the CWA (Country Women's Association) on the tour. We were having some scones for morning tea and I mentioned that had made them a few days ago and was quite pleased with the results, after not having made them for years. They said the couldn't make scones. I was shocked I tell you shocked "Be in the CWA and not be able to make scones. Is that allowed?" :p That made them laugh.

Anyhow back on topic. I have seen the different types of flour in the supermarket recently and thought about getting the right type (I think I have read an article). But I don't do enough baking to make it worthwhile.

ChasFink 27 November 2018 02:25 PM

To those who think this
https://www.pillsbury.com/-/media/PB...iginal-8ct.jpg
is not a good way to make biscuits, it's because you're not putting THIS on them.
https://www.tonychachere.com/GetImag...0&maxWidth=300

Unfortunately, that's hard to find in the Northeast as well.

Crius of CoH 27 November 2018 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChasFink (Post 1992096)
To those who think this is not a good way to make biscuits, it's because you're not putting THIS on them.

Unfortunately, that's hard to find in the Northeast as well.

And I, for one, am unhappy about that. Biscuits and gravy are one of my favorite side benefits from traveling down south. Or out west.

overyonder 27 November 2018 08:07 PM

I'm on a Facebook discussion group for Canadian Snowbirds that spend their winters in FL/SC, all of them agree to the same thing: They bring flour from Canada to the US.

OY

DawnStorm 28 November 2018 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overyonder (Post 1992155)
I'm on a Facebook discussion group for Canadian Snowbirds that spend their winters in FL/SC, all of them agree to the same thing: They bring flour from Canada to the US.

OY

That explains why DH and I have seen so many cars with Canadian plates on them during our roads trips to Florida. :lol: Didn't think they were coming to America to stop at South of the Border.

overyonder 28 November 2018 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DawnStorm (Post 1992201)
That explains why DH and I have seen so many cars with Canadian plates on them during our roads trips to Florida. :lol: Didn't think they were coming to America to stop at South of the Border.

Some Snowbird folks stay in SC. It's obviously not as warm as FL but the golfing is good year round. Myrtle Beach is a common destination with non-stop direct flights from Plattsburgh NY (aka "Montreal's American airport").

OY

dfresh 28 November 2018 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overyonder (Post 1992214)
with non-stop direct flights from Plattsburgh NY (aka "Montreal's American airport").

OY

I have wondered why that airport was as busy as it was, since there is not a lot up there.

overyonder 28 November 2018 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dfresh (Post 1992220)
I have wondered why that airport was as busy as it was, since there is not a lot up there.

Mostly flights to warmer destinations on Allegiant/Spirit/etc. Penn Air used to fly scheduled flights there to/from Boston (still does? not sure), now United also flies there to/from Dulles.

It's convenient to fly out of PBG instead of Montreal (less traffic especially for people that do not reside on the Island of Montreal), usually with better prices, especially with discount carriers.

OY


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