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-   -   Death Valley: People, Quit Frying Eggs on the Sidewalk (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=86293)

Reading Girl 11 July 2013 01:30 PM

Death Valley: People, Quit Frying Eggs on the Sidewalk
 
Quote:

Rangers in Death Valley National Park say it's tough enough working in the hottest place on the planet without having to clean up the mess after people try to fry eggs on the pavement in parking lots and overlooks
http://www.newser.com/story/170741/d...gg-frying.html

Seaboe Muffinchucker 11 July 2013 03:30 PM

I like the fact that "it doesn't work anyway" is at the very end of the article.

Seaboe

Beachlife! 11 July 2013 03:35 PM

I heard a segment on NPR about how death valley is positively crammed with foreign tourists this time of year. Apparently it is a thing call "Heat Tourism" where people come out just to experience the extremely temperatures.

WildaBeast 29 July 2013 06:53 PM

So do the same sort of tourists go to International Falls for extreme cold temperatures?

MrWhitman 11 July 2014 01:39 AM

They're right, it doesn't work frying an egg on the pavement. What you should do is try to fry an egg on your car dash after it's been left in the sun for a couple hours.

zarchery 01 August 2014 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beachlife! (Post 1751484)
I heard a segment on NPR about how death valley is positively crammed with foreign tourists this time of year. Apparently it is a thing call "Heat Tourism" where people come out just to experience the extremely temperatures.

I watch Ice Road Truckers, which is about truck drivers driving in Northern Alaska and Canada during the winter time. They'll talk about temperatures well below freezing, as low as -50 Farenheit I've heard. Now there's an extreme I'd love to experience.

Skeptic 01 August 2014 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zarchery (Post 1835886)
I watch Ice Road Truckers, which is about truck drivers driving in Northern Alaska and Canada during the winter time. They'll talk about temperatures well below freezing, as low as -50 Farenheit I've heard. Now there's an extreme I'd love to experience.

Ouch. That's cold. I've been in similar in Switzerland. The hottest I have been in is 45. C ( 113 F ), once in Australia and another time in Pakistan. I'd always prefer extreme heat to extreme cold.

Tootsie Plunkette 02 August 2014 12:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MrWhitman (Post 1832169)
What you should do is try to fry an egg on your car dash after it's been left in the sun for a couple hours.

There needs to be some equivalent for the top of a steering wheel. An egg would just run off - maybe fry some bacon? There are days I think it would work.

erwins 02 August 2014 01:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skeptic (Post 1835905)
Ouch. That's cold. I've been in similar in Switzerland. The hottest I have been in is 45. C ( 113 F ), once in Australia and another time in Pakistan. I'd always prefer extreme heat to extreme cold.

The hottest I've been in was 117 F (>47 C) in Redding California, and -13 F (-25 C) in Norway. I can't say that I liked either extreme, but with the cold, we were cross-country skiing, so that kept me warmed up a bit. The heat was just absolutely will-to-live-sapping. I think if I had to just hang out in one or the other, I'd take the heat, but I'd still hate it. :cool:

ETA: In Redding, things on the seat of my car melted, including a cassette tape case that became curved and embossed with the pattern of the upholstery (and was stuck to it pretty good when I pulled it off)

crescent 02 August 2014 05:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beachlife! (Post 1751484)
I heard a segment on NPR about how death valley is positively crammed with foreign tourists this time of year. Apparently it is a thing call "Heat Tourism" where people come out just to experience the extremely temperatures.

That, and it is summer. Many people can only get time off to travel in the summer. Many of the foreign tourists are on bus tours that travel between Vegas and San Francisco, with overnight stops in Death Valley and Yosemite.

I never fried eggs on pavement when I lived there, but laundry was fun. I would take it out of the washing machine and over to the line. By the time I was done hanging the last items, some of the first items I had hung were dry enough to take back off the line. Jeans took the longest, about 15 minutes on the line.

In that kind of heat, if you in a cool building and walk outside, you get goosebumps for a few moments. Things look, smell, and even sound different.

UrbanLegends101 02 August 2014 10:30 AM

115 degrees F now.

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldcloc...it/kuwait-city

The hottest I've experienced here was 127 degrees F.

Singing in the Drizzle 02 August 2014 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skeptic (Post 1835905)
Ouch. That's cold. I've been in similar in Switzerland. The hottest I have been in is 45. C ( 113 F ), once in Australia and another time in Pakistan. I'd always prefer extreme heat to extreme cold.

The hottest was my first week in Phoenix AZ with temperatures reaching 120 F. I have spent some very cold winter nights camping in the mountains that were at least in the negative teens. Not having a anyway to accurately guess the temperature I will just say it was very cold. The worst to live though was Georgia in August with +90 F days with the humidity hovering around 98% and a heat index above 130 F.

RichardM 02 August 2014 07:25 PM

117 in Phoenix once. I was supposed to inspect an air conditioning unit on the roof of a building. I climbed the ladder to the roof, opened the hatch and felt the heat increase. The roof was black. I poked my head out the hatch and saw there was an air conditioner of some sort on the roof. I refrained from getting out onto the roof.

crocoduck_hunter 02 August 2014 08:01 PM

I don't understand why people voluntarily live in areas that get that kind of heat. :p

Hero_Mike 02 August 2014 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter (Post 1835988)
I don't understand why people voluntarily live in areas that get that kind of heat. :p

Because this past year, the winter rarely had rain or even temperatures into the 40's. You don't get 100+F all year, but you also don't get weather below freezing. I have many snowbird neighbors who are retired or are business owners, and have the freedom to live in two different parts of the country - they still miss out on what I believe are the best times of year here - March/April or late October/November.

I've been to places where it gets to -40F and stays there - winter there is miserable. I've never met anyone who wants to experience that as a "winter tourist" - people don't take many cruises to Alaska in the dead of winter. Living in a place where it gets that brutally cold is really unpleasant. In North America, there are only a few large cities where it gets that cold - those are mostly in Canada and the cost of living there is astronomical. Every time you leave the house it takes longer to do everything - dressing, driving, shoveling, scraping - traffic is slow and weather-induced accidents are everywhere. Not only that, but winter in those places makes for very short days. In Edmonton in January you'll have only 7.5 hours of daylight, meaning that you commute to or from work is in the dark, but likely both. And that's only 53 North Latitude - the same latitude as Liverpool England, and still south of Scotland - so it's really the combination of cold and dark which makes those winters so miserable. It's not surprising that a lot of very northern European countries have high suicide rates.

I don't understand people who say "It's so much easier to deal with cold than heat - if you get cold, you can just put on more clothing." Obviously anyone who ever said that has never had to sleep in their car when it's 20 below...

Lainie 03 August 2014 03:24 PM

Me neither. I'm the opposite of Skeptic, I'd take cold over heat any day. I'm prone to heat exhaustion, for one thing.

UrbanLegends101 03 August 2014 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter (Post 1835988)
I don't understand why people voluntarily live in areas that get that kind of heat. :p

I suppose voluntary might be a bit qualified? I work here and have been here a few years.

I can't tell you I enjoy the heat, but it is tolerable. We tend to stay inside air conditioning for the most part.

Beachlife! 03 August 2014 10:49 PM

Although my reasons for living in a cold climate are not the climate, I much prefer cooler over hotter. Its not so hard to layer up to stay warm and over time one gets acclimated to cooler temperatures. I don't personally like being overly hot, especially when I am trying to sleep at night.

One of the other big bonuses to cooler climates is fewer small unpleasant or venomous creatures to deal with.

Chloe 03 August 2014 10:58 PM

I just don't want to deal with snow on the ground for four months of the year. Ten years in upstate NY was enough; now my rule is south of the Mason-Dixon line.

crocoduck_hunter 03 August 2014 11:00 PM

That's what I love about the Pacific Northwest: it's relatively cool in the summer but you rarely ever get significant snowfall.


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