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-   -   Woman restrained after trying to open airplane cabin door during flight (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=96484)

Psihala 06 March 2018 03:34 AM

Woman restrained after trying to open airplane cabin door during flight
 
Passengers onboard United Express Flight 5449 restrained a Boise, Idaho, woman who was ranting about being God. Video posted online purportedly shows a passenger working to tie up the woman's feet as another man holds her down in the aisle.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/flight-...ay-2018-03-05/

Lainie 06 March 2018 12:13 PM

Maybe it's just an oddly written article, but why is there no mention of the crew? Surely they were involved in restraining her, even if passengers did the actual tying-up.

GenYus234 06 March 2018 01:33 PM

They may not have been involved. Depending on when in the flight it occurred, the flight crew may have not been near the door when she tried to open it. From similar events such as this one it seems like passengers will sometimes restrain someone without any input from the flight crew.

thorny locust 06 March 2018 01:50 PM

I would hope that the flight crew would notice if some of the passengers started tying other passengers up!

Not that they didn't have good reason in this case; but it really doesn't sound like something that the flight crew should just ignore.

GenYus234 06 March 2018 02:13 PM

I didn't mean that the flight crew ignored it, I just meant that they may not done the restraining or directed the passengers to do so as they saw that they were already handling it.

Dasla 07 March 2018 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GenYus234 (Post 1973537)
I didn't mean that the flight crew ignored it, I just meant that they may not done the restraining or directed the passengers to do so as they saw that they were already handling it.

That is how I read your initial comment GenYus.

Little Pink Pill 07 March 2018 08:16 PM

Given some of the stories we’ve been hearing about the bad behavior of flight crews I can understand that reading, but I assumed GenYus meant the passengers got there first and the flight crew didn’t have to step in. It seems like a reasonable response if it looked like the situation was handled.

Psihala 07 March 2018 08:48 PM

I'm going to make a wild assumption here and guess it depends on where in the plane they were when the incident took place.

The Embraer 175 isn't a terribly big airplane (I've heard plane enthusiasts refer to it as a "baby 737" because of its twin, wing-mounted jet engines and the winglets on the tips of the wings). It has twin-seating--two seats per side, per row--with a fairly common capacity of 76 passengers, 2 pilots, and 2 flight attendants.

That being said, the E-175 isn't a terribly wide plane, either. If the unruly passenger was at the front of the airplane and the flight attendants were near the back when the incident took place, the intervening passengers could very well have blocked their way at first. It's possible once the passengers restrained her, the flight attendants/crew assumed responsibility for controlling the situation and it just wasn't reported in the article.

~Psihala

WildaBeast 07 March 2018 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Psihala (Post 1973687)
If the unruly passenger was at the front of the airplane and the flight attendants were near the back when the incident took place, the intervening passengers could very well have blocked their way at first. It's possible once the passengers restrained her, the flight attendants/crew assumed responsibility for controlling the situation and it just wasn't reported in the article.

~Psihala

In United's configuration there's a small First Class cabin at the front, and IIRC it's fairly typical to have one flight attendant solely attend to the First Class passengers, while the other works the economy cabin. So I'd say it's more likely the FAs were toward the front of the plane, and the passenger tried to open one of the rear doors. But that's pretty much a nitpick.

Veruca 07 March 2018 09:20 PM

Honestly, to me it sounds kind of weird for flight crew to look over, see passengers tying another passenger up, and hang back thinking "Meh. Situation handled." But I've never worked for an airline, and I don't know what the protocol is for erratic/potentially dangerous passengers, so I can't say exactly what they should have done instead.

GenYus234 07 March 2018 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WildaBeast (Post 1973688)
So I'd say it's more likely the FAs were toward the front of the plane, and the passenger tried to open one of the rear doors. But that's pretty much a nitpick.

In the video attached to the article, the woman appears to be in the first class section as there is only one seatback visible on the left side (about 12 seconds).
The First Class section on E75's is one seat on the left, two on the right so that would correspond to being in the first class area. Also, a passenger's armrest is visible (about 21 seconds) and it is a lot wider than cabin class armrests usually are.

WildaBeast 07 March 2018 10:10 PM

Ah, ok. I wasn't able to watch the video at work.

mbravo 07 March 2018 10:13 PM

This never would have happened if she'd been allowed her emotional support peacock.


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