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-   -   Stupid questions (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=91223)

Mr. Billion 03 February 2015 11:04 PM

Stupid questions
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GenYus
Is this the last question before snopes closes this thread?

Yes.

Is it too soon to start a new one?

DaGuyWitBluGlasses 04 February 2015 02:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cervus
Is there an equivalent of Reverse Image Search for a hard drive? Years ago I uploaded a picture to Facebook that I can't find on my hard drive now. I don't know what the file name would have been, or if it got moved to the wrong folder. I hope I didn't delete it. I can copy it off of FB but I want the original file.


http://www.mindgems.com/products/VS-...SDIF-About.htm

or

http://www.visipics.info/index.php?title=Main_Page

**Disclaimer: i've not used either of them, so i can't vouch for reliability.

Mouse 05 February 2015 12:44 AM

I heard an interesting fact. Since North Korea's economy is pretty much in the ground beneath the toilet, in order to support themselves, the government has apparently gotten involved in all kinds of criminal activities. One of them is counterfeiting US $100 dollar bills so accurate that law enforcement has taken to calling them supernotes or superdollars because it's so hard to tell them from the real thing. My question is given that paper money is pretty much a social construct (in that we've arbitrarily agreed that this pretty paper is worth more than that pretty paper), is it possible that with the right equipment/expertise, you could reach the point where you're actually producing legitimate money?

I should admit, just in case the FBI/Secret Service/lizard people cabal are reading, that i have not nor will I ever make fake money. I'm just curious is all.

WildaBeast 05 February 2015 12:58 AM

As far as US dollars are concerned (or any other currency like Euros or Pounds or Yen etc.), no. Part of that social construct is that we all agree that only the pretty pieces of paper printed by the US Bureau of Printing and Engraving are worth anything, so even if a counterfeiter had the ability to produce pieces of paper that were in every way identical to US currency it still wouldn't be legitimate money.

I'm not an economist, but if snopes printed up a bunch of "snopes bucks" and snopesters all agreed that we would trade those snopes bucks among ourselves in exchange for goods and services, that probably could be considered a legitimate form of money, not unlike Bitcoin. They probably wouldn't get a very good exchange rate for Dollars, though, as the snopes economy would be rather small.

Errata 05 February 2015 01:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WildaBeast (Post 1859853)
I'm not an economist, but if snopes printed up a bunch of "snopes bucks" and snopesters all agreed that we would trade those snopes bucks among ourselves in exchange for goods and services, that probably could be considered a legitimate form of money, not unlike Bitcoin. They probably wouldn't get a very good exchange rate for Dollars, though, as the snopes economy would be rather small.

There are quite a lot of local currencies in the US. I managed to live in a town that had one without ever actually seeing one of the bills in person.

The exchange rate depends on how money enters and exits circulation. It doesn't follow that a small economy has a low value currency. If the policy is that some clown can print as many as he wants on a whim, then that will ensure a poor exchange rate. If there isn't anything useful that you can reliably spend the money on, then that's also likely to hurt it. But if there is something of value that you can always get with the money, it requires something of value to acquire it, and you have reasonable faith that it will remain that way, then it can have a stable value even in a small economy.

One could argue that videogames with in-game currency based micropayments have created a proliferation of new currencies. But the extent to which they could be considered "real" varies from game to game based on exactly how it works. In some games it's little more than store credit, while in others there is a fairly robust economy of players trading with one another for various things and exchanging back and forth with real money.

Alchemy 05 February 2015 02:09 AM

From the previous thread:

Quote:

Originally Posted by WildaBeast
So has anyone ever made a seven cylinder engine?

Not a car engine, so far as I know.

Quote:

I assume there must be some technical advantage to an even number, like being able to always have one piston at the top of its stroke when another is at the bottom.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engine_balance

Even numbers of cylinders introduce certain types of imbalances but these are generally milder than odd-cylinder imbalances and usually only appear at high RPM. An inline 3 or 5 can have a lot of advantages but they require a lot more design work to counteract their inherent imbalances.

Inline 3's are very light and, among other things, let you synch up the intake and exhaust pretty much perfectly. One major downside is that you need a heavily-counterweighted crankshaft to dampen the effects of the large gaps between power strokes. This translates to heavy-flywheel non-sporty performance (takes excessive time to change RPM due to the large rotational inertia). But if you have a hybrid where the engine drives a generator instead of the drivewheels, quick RPM response is irrelevant, so you get the benefit of the i3 efficiency without the reduction in driveability. Thus the popularity of i3's in hybrids.

Inline 5's introduce certain imbalances over i4's (which you can engineer out), but they create a significant overlap between power strokes, thus the popularity (or at least existence) in sportier cars. You get a lot of the benefit of a i6 (or v6) with less size/weight.

An inline-6 is already at about the limit of practicality for engine size, so past that you're going to have a v configuration, and in an offset setup the imbalance of an odd-cylindered engine is too extreme to counterbalance effectively.

Quote:

Originally Posted by GenYus234
Interesting note: For the old aircraft radial engines, they had to have an odd number of cylinders. Because a four stroke engine's cylinders fire every other cycle, an engine with an even number of cylinders would need incredibly complicated cams to run at all.

Which is why small aircraft engines tend to be flat 4's. (Which gets you some of the air-cooling benefits of a radial without needing the massive number of cylinders.)

Cervus 05 February 2015 02:23 AM

Update for anyone interested: It looks like the original file was indeed accidentally deleted. I'm annoyed and bummed, but oh well.

Esprise Me 05 February 2015 03:38 AM

Mouse, your question reminded me of a segment I saw on a news show years ago. This guy made counterfeit hundred-dollar bills as an art form, and would go to local merchants, explain that the bill was a counterfeit he created as a hobby, and ask whether they would give him merchandise in exchange for it. Most stores refused, but one actually agreed. It was interesting because he was being completely upfront about it; he made it very clear to everyone that it wasn't real money. In a way, it's not so different than any other kind of bartering; you make something, you ask someone else to trade you something of theirs for it; as long as everyone knows what they're getting and agrees to it it's all fair. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure the retailer who agreed to give him merchandise in exchange for the counterfeit bill did so not because he appreciated the artistry of creating such a convincing forgery, but because he figured he could just drop the fake bill in the register and no one would ever have to know. And I think the artist had to know that was at least a risk, and therefore maybe should bear some responsibility.

Don Enrico 05 February 2015 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mouse (Post 1859852)
My question is given that paper money is pretty much a social construct (...), is it possible that with the right equipment/expertise, you could reach the point where you're actually producing legitimate money?

In Germany (and as far as I know all over Europe), the legal construct is that money is not legitimated money unless it's issued by the proper institution as such. That way, even notes printed for the Deutsche Bundesbank are not legitimate money if they are stolen en route between the printing press and the Bundesbank safe rooms, before being issued. There are no means to distinquish them from proper Money, but legally they are just pretty papers.

Lainie 05 February 2015 12:10 PM

Yes, the legitimacy of the money is not based on the skill with which it is produced.

Mouse 06 February 2015 02:01 AM

"I can't take his money. I can't print my own money. I have to work for my money. Why don't I just lay down and die?"

Okay now that I've gotten that obligatory Simpsons quote out of my system, I've got another question.

Where exactly did the racist caricatures of Black people having huge red lips come from? Granted it's probably a case of, like with all racist shit, that y'know it started with one exaggerated piece of shit and just kept getting worse until it achieved meme status, but I am a little curious. Especially since we had a little thread about how Watermelon became a racist trope because it was planted by Blacks (and poor whites, but y'know the racists kind of ignore that part) who liked it because it was sweet, cheap, and easy to grow, and it spiraled from there.

Lordy, I swear I hadn't planned on filling this thread with so many weird, possibly uncomfortable questions, but here we are. :fish:

diddy 06 February 2015 02:17 AM

Like a lot of racial stereotypes it probably came from exaggerated minstrel shows (plays) and literature that were generally not flattering in their depictions of non white characters. Lots of racial stereotypes were due to blackface portrayals.

The idea was to depict blacks as unintelligent simpletons who were not to be viewed as equals. The big red lips thing is an exaggeration of the mammy stereotype (along with other depictions in blackface). It was an exaggeration of how whites wanted to depict blacks. It was even done by blacks as well.

From Wikipedia:
Quote:

Blackface was an important performance tradition in the American theater for roughly 100 years beginning around 1830. It quickly became popular elsewhere, particularly so in Britain, where the tradition lasted longer than in the US, occurring on primetime TV as late as 1978 (The Black and White Minstrel Show) and 1981. In both the United States and Britain, blackface was most commonly used in the minstrel performance tradition, which it both predated and outlasted. White blackface performers in the past used burnt cork and later greasepaint or shoe polish to blacken their skin and exaggerate their lips, often wearing woolly wigs, gloves, tailcoats, or ragged clothes to complete the transformation. Later, black artists also performed in blackface.
.

Cervus 06 February 2015 05:51 PM

After watching the clip several times, I still have no idea what the "left shark" did wrong during Katy Perry's halftime performance. Also: her left, or the viewer's left? What shark am I supposed to be reacting to?

Tootsie Plunkette 06 February 2015 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cervus (Post 1860134)
After watching the clip several times, I still have no idea what the "left shark" did wrong during Katy Perry's halftime performance. Also: her left, or the viewer's left? What shark am I supposed to be reacting to?

I haven't re-watched the clip, but the article I read said that he basically blanked on the choreography, so was just vamping in time to the music until he found his place again.

Cervus 06 February 2015 06:07 PM

That's what I'd heard, so I watched the clip. There was no obvious "blanking out" at least nothing like what I was expecting. At one point, for a few seconds, he moved his arm differently than the other dancer. Is that noteworthy?

Seaboe Muffinchucker 06 February 2015 06:13 PM

I understand from an attendee that KP was facing the Seahawks bench, meaning everyone else only saw her back or side. Plus, the acoustics were very bad and you could not tell what she was singing.

Which all goes to confirm that the halftime show is for the TV audience, not the attendees.

So, my stupid question is--was the 1/2 time show ever intended for the attendees? If so, when did that change?

Seaboe

Tootsie Plunkette 06 February 2015 06:24 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...halftime_shows

Quote:

During most of the Super Bowl's first decade, the halftime show featured a college marching band. The show's second decade featured a more varied show, often featuring drill teams and other performance ensembles; ... The middle of the third decade, in an effort to counter other networks' efforts to counterprogram the game, saw the introduction of popular music acts such as New Kids on the Block, Gloria Estefan, Michael Jackson, Prince, Clint Black, Patti LaBelle, and Tony Bennett.
I'd guess the "middle of the third decade" may be the answer. However, a lot of marching bands focus their performance to one side of the stadium, particularly those that march to form words or images.

ETA: This article includes a snippet of video showing the left shark (to KP's right) not matching the movements of right shark (rs fins go up and he bends at one point). Not much of a glitch but it's there.

Gibbie 06 February 2015 07:19 PM

Am I the only one who noticed that the sharks were basically doing the Macarena?

snopes 06 February 2015 08:03 PM

Quote:

The middle of the third decade, in an effort to counter other networks' efforts to counterprogram the game, saw the introduction of popular music acts
Is there really a danger that a significant number of people are going to tune out the Super Bowl at halftime and not watch the rest? I think that only happens when the game is one-sided, in which case they're probably not sticking around for the halftime show in the first place.

Latiam 08 February 2015 12:19 AM

Why will my iTunes not accept previous purchases that are no longer in the store and put them in my library from my iPod? I'm trying to change computers and this is very annoying.
Can I use a backup from my other computer to get them in?


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