snopes.com

snopes.com (http://message.snopes.com/index.php)
-   The Doctor Is In (http://message.snopes.com/forumdisplay.php?f=62)
-   -   You're probably brushing your teeth with fecal matter (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=95590)

Psihala 06 April 2017 10:04 PM

You're probably brushing your teeth with fecal matter
 
Your toothbrush is home to plaque, blood and even fecal matter.

Yes, you're probably scrubbing poop particles all over your pearly whites.

http://www.9news.com/news/health/you...tter/429260245

ganzfeld 06 April 2017 10:44 PM

What else would one use?

GenYus234 06 April 2017 10:56 PM

Things you are also probably brushing your teeth with: arsenic, barium, benzene, cadmium, cyanide, lead, mercury, toluene, and many, many more.

Lainie 06 April 2017 11:00 PM

This kind of stuff doesn't faze me. Mites that live in my bed and eat skin flakes? Beats sleeping in a pile of dead skin.

WildaBeast 07 April 2017 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Psihala (Post 1946351)
Your toothbrush is home to plaque, blood and even fecal matter.

Oh, plaque. I read that as plague at first.

Honestly that one kind of seems kind of obvious. I mean you use your toothbrush to remove plaque from your teeth, so of course plaque ends up on your toothbrush. Where else is it going to go?

ganzfeld 07 April 2017 02:41 AM

In most Japanese homes, even most (but not all) flats, the sink and bath are completely separate from the toilet. So if that's the problem, no problem.

Avril 07 April 2017 04:02 AM

Mythbusters did a test on this. It didn't matter where you kept the toothbrush, fecal matter is everywhere.

ganzfeld 07 April 2017 04:24 AM

Well, it's in the kitchen too then, I guess. (The article just says they tested "outside the bathroom" not everywhere. Not that I've ever been impressed with Mythbusters scientific rigour but that's another conversation...)

crocoduck_hunter 07 April 2017 04:30 AM

The important thing to remember is that you've been doing this for years with no ill effects.

Avril 07 April 2017 04:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ganzfeld (Post 1946370)
Well, it's in the kitchen too then, I guess. (The article just says they tested "outside the bathroom" not everywhere. Not that I've ever been impressed with Mythbusters scientific rigour but that's another conversation...)

Well, aside from Mythbusters, we could extrapolate from other tests that have found fecal matter outside bathrooms, as well as all manner of germy things.

I'm really unperturbed by this, actually. What crockoduck said sums it up for me.

ganzfeld 07 April 2017 04:52 AM

I'm unpreturbed (unpreturded? there's a pun there somewhere but it stinks) too but I'm not so sure it has no ill effects. I would seriously doubt it has no positive effects either since we evolved to live in it - probably a lot more of it than we do now.

crocoduck_hunter 07 April 2017 06:05 AM

The sense of smell works by pieces of whatever your smelling getting into your nose. When you sit on the toilet and smell your business, you're inhaling far more fecal matter than what's getting on your toothbrush.

ganzfeld 07 April 2017 07:04 AM

I've explained that to the toothbrush several times but he is inconsolable.

Crius of CoH 07 April 2017 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter (Post 1946378)
The sense of smell works by pieces of whatever your smelling getting into your nose. When you sit on the toilet and smell your business, you're inhaling far more fecal matter than what's getting on your toothbrush.

Not really.

Dreams of Thinking Machines 19 July 2017 07:56 PM

"Fecal matter?!" you exclaim as you spit out the glass of dinosaur pee you were drinking.

mbravo 20 July 2017 12:46 AM

We just need to start wiping our bottoms with toothpaste to even things out.

jimmy101_again 20 July 2017 03:50 AM

It is widely accepted that the ingestion of some fecal matter is good for you. That's how bacteria that make your guts work get transferred across the population.

Many animals regularly eat the droppings of others for this reason.

People take poop pills. (e.g. http://www.npr.org/sections/health-s...ing-infections)

Some have expressed the concern that on extremely long space fights (measured in generations), the small population and extremely small bacteriome might lead to a failure of the digestive bacteria leading to serous health problems.

ASL 20 July 2017 04:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimmy101_again (Post 1954358)
Some have expressed the concern that on extremely long space fights (measured in generations), the small population and extremely small bacteriome might lead to a failure of the digestive bacteria leading to serous health problems.

Interesting, but I would imagine moving cultures of bacteria would be trivial compared to the problem of moving people. Which isn't to say it's an insignificant problem, just that, as a known (or anticipated problem) the solution ought to be simple enough, all things considered.

jimmy101_again 20 July 2017 04:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ASL (Post 1954362)
Interesting, but I would imagine moving cultures of bacteria would be trivial compared to the problem of moving people. Which isn't to say it's an insignificant problem, just that, as a known (or anticipated problem) the solution ought to be simple enough, all things considered.

The issue is the lack of spontaneous developing diversity. You can take a butt-load (giggle) of bacteria with you but that isn't what is needed. What is needed is a large enough population of people and bacteria for the needed bacteria to evolve naturally in response to the characteristics of diet and life. It is unlikely that suitable bacteria exist on Earth now since they would not be needed and have not been selected for the peculiarities of multi-generational space travel in a very limited biome.


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:43 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.