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-   -   Subway ‘Crisis’: Is Footlong Sub Really 11 Inches? (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=83941)

Beachlife! 19 January 2013 10:25 PM

I keep mine on the counter, except in the hot days of summer when I put it in the fridge to avoid mold.

thorny locust 19 January 2013 10:53 PM

IME, bread's not going to dry out very fast in the refrigerator if you put it in a closed plastic bag; which is the way a lot of it comes nowadays anyway. I wonder if that might be old advice from pre-plastic days, being repeated through the generations even when it's not applicable?

It will keep longest in the freezer; but even homemade no-preservative bread will keep for several days to a week in the refrigerator.

Hero_Mike 19 January 2013 10:58 PM

What TGirl said. One of the reasons why the "Subway Diet" worked is because it emphasizes one thing almost all of us have trouble with - portion control. For so many of us, cooking a single-serving meal for one is not an optimal use of time, so we make a larger portion in the hopes of creating leftovers - for the next day or the next week (if we have a freezer) - but if there's more food there, it is very, very difficult to not eat more of it. Especially when it's a favorite.

Sue 19 January 2013 10:58 PM

I haven't noticed that the bread dries out in the fridge I just find it takes on a flavour I don't like. Not sure what it is exactly and it's faint but it's there.

Esprise Me 19 January 2013 11:24 PM

"Stale" is a matter of opinion. "Mold" is a matter of safety.

videoguy 19 January 2013 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thorny locust (Post 1705085)
IME, bread's not going to dry out very fast in the refrigerator if you put it in a closed plastic bag; which is the way a lot of it comes nowadays anyway. I wonder if that might be old advice from pre-plastic days, being repeated through the generations even when it's not applicable?

It's not old advice. The 2nd article I posted says that it's about the coolness of the fridge and the condensation. So, I don't think the bag is going to help any. Some bags even say "for maximum freshness, store at room temperature."

TurquoiseGirl 20 January 2013 12:34 AM

Meh. The humidity here is generally low. I store my bread in the fridge as well.

Esprise me, a box of Joe-Joes is also not safe in my house.

mags 20 January 2013 12:40 AM

For us, moldiness always happens before staleness when bread is left on the counter. So, the fridge it is. We still often end up not using the whole loaf before it dries out, but we get through more of it than we would before it started growing things at room temperature.

thorny locust 20 January 2013 01:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by videoguy (Post 1705102)
The 2nd article I posted says that it's about the coolness of the fridge and the condensation.

That article's saying, if I read it right, that the bread dries out because the starch molecules can't hold as much water when they're cold; so they expel it.

But I don't find condensation on the inside of the bag (unless I bag the bread while it's still hot from the oven, in which case I find condensation whether I leave it at room temperature or refrigerate it); so where is the water going?

In any case: the progression of staleness in the refrigerator goes a whole lot slower than the progression of mold outside the refrigerator. Many grocery breads have preservatives added; maybe enough preservatives prevent the mold, and maybe those breads do keep better outside the fridge.

Latiam 20 January 2013 03:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avril (Post 1704548)
If you over-poof the bread, it ends up wider and a bit shorter.

One of many reasons I only lasted, in my youth, for four days as a Subway Sandwich Artist was the manager's lectures on over-poofing.

Nine months for me.

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1958Fury (Post 1704722)
In my experience (I worked at Subway off and on for about 6 years), the length of the bread can vary anywhere from 11 to 12 inches depending on how long you proof the bread. Also, if you let the breadsticks thaw before proofing them, you can stretch them a bit before they go into the proofer for extra length. However, you're getting the same amount of food either way. *snip*

And you were in fact supposed to do this - let them thaw, stretch them, then proof them - but it wasn't overemphasized in the training materials.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DevilBunny (Post 1704782)
Weird. I've never seen it called anything but 'proving'. 'Proofing' just seems so... ungrammatical... (though I'm perfectly happy with the word in a proofreading concept, so I guess hypocrisy will out!)

Dictionary.com does list both variants, though, so... weird :)

If it makes you feel better, our oven has a "Bread Proof" setting and that how I've seen it in cookbooks too.

Beachlife! 20 January 2013 03:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thorny locust (Post 1705133)
That article's saying, if I read it right, that the bread dries out because the starch molecules can't hold as much water when they're cold; so they expel it....

This sounds right. A fresh loaf of bread in a cold car will leave condensation all over the inside of the bag.

MapleLeaf 20 January 2013 06:00 AM

I always keep my bread in the fridge. But I also always toast it. I don't like soft slices of bread. It has yet to ever go moldy, and some loaves were in there for at least a month.

Lainie 20 January 2013 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DevilBunny (Post 1704782)
Weird. I've never seen it called anything but 'proving'. 'Proofing' just seems so... ungrammatical... (though I'm perfectly happy with the word in a proofreading concept, so I guess hypocrisy will out!)

Proofreading is reading a "proof," though, so originally "proof" was a noun in that context, although course now we shorten "proofread" to "proof" and use it as a noun.

I've never seen "proof" used as a verb outside the bread-baking context.

And after typing this post, I find that "proof" looks really weird to me. :)

geminilee 20 January 2013 09:43 AM

Waterproofing. Fireproofing.

Lainie 20 January 2013 01:37 PM

Okay, not by itself outside that context. ;)

Seriously, though, those are the verb forms of compound adjectives -- when one waterproofs something, one is making it waterproof. I've never seen someone use "proof" instead of "prove" to refer to proving in the sense that one proves a theorem, or the case against an accused person.

geminilee 20 January 2013 02:41 PM

Do you prove bread like a theorem, or do you proof it against being flat?

Lainie 20 January 2013 03:08 PM

The latter, I think. What would I prove about bread? :)


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