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-   -   Subway ‘Crisis’: Is Footlong Sub Really 11 Inches? (http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=83941)

Lainie 18 January 2013 05:24 PM

With only one or two people in a household, it can be hard to use up perishables.

Sue 18 January 2013 05:29 PM

Even in a bigger household it can still be a challenge. And even if using up the perishables isn't an issue storing it can be. Recently I decided to try WW and bought (among a lot of other fruits and veggies) the ingredients for their vegetable soup. I thought my fridge was a good size. Apparently if you are trying to eat healthier and have more fresh produce it actually isn't.

1958Fury 18 January 2013 05:53 PM

In my experience (I worked at Subway off and on for about 6 years), the length of the bread can vary anywhere from 11 to 12 inches depending on how long you proof the bread. Also, if you let the breadsticks thaw before proofing them, you can stretch them a bit before they go into the proofer for extra length. However, you're getting the same amount of food either way. It's the same amount of bread, just more or less dense (and very slightly at that). It's the same amount of meat, which is generally done by number of slices (they don't just put down meat until it matches the length of the bread). Same number of slices of cheese. Some of the vegetables are counted as well - we were always told to put 4 tomatoes on a footlong, for instance.

You could argue that an inch longer sub means you'll get more lettuce and other scattered veggies. But most employees will gladly give you extra lettuce or whatever if you ask for it, at no extra charge. (I did have one manager who would charge extra if you absolutely went nuts with certain vegetables, but for most people this isn't a worry.) So yes, the length might vary slightly, but a shorter sandwhich just means it's extra tall.

crocoduck_hunter 18 January 2013 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sue (Post 1704717)
Even in a bigger household it can still be a challenge. And even if using up the perishables isn't an issue storing it can be. Recently I decided to try WW and bought (among a lot of other fruits and veggies) the ingredients for their vegetable soup. I thought my fridge was a good size. Apparently if you are trying to eat healthier and have more fresh produce it actually isn't.

I've found that if you're making soup that isn't prepackaged, unless you've got a huge number of people you're going to need to freeze a bunch of it- you just can't easily make it in small enough quantities for only a couple of people.

Avril 18 January 2013 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KirkMcD (Post 1704585)
Nitpick, its "proofing"

Not according to my manager's daily rant.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gibbie (Post 1704592)
Though I love "poofing." :lol:

I'm glad someone does. It made me want to strangle her.

DevilBunny 18 January 2013 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gibbie (Post 1704592)

Weird. I've never seen it called anything but 'proving'. 'Proofing' just seems so... ungrammatical... (though I'm perfectly happy with the word in a proofreading concept, so I guess hypocrisy will out!)

Dictionary.com does list both variants, though, so... weird :)

Beachlife! 18 January 2013 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lainie (Post 1704715)
With only one or two people in a household, it can be hard to use up perishables.

Yes, this subject comes up with my daughters and I who went from living in one household with a well stocked refrigerator to living in three separate household with thee refrigerators. We are each always chasing what is going to expire soon and trying to eat that up before food is wasted.

After Thanksgiving each year I make gallons of soup which I bag up in gallon zip locks and freeze it. In the average year, I'm using the last gallon sometime during the summer.

HazyCosmicJive 19 January 2013 03:37 AM

I am vegan and eat a lot of fresh vegetables. I live alone and have never had a problem using what I buy before it goes bad. Mileage varies, obviously.

Mickey Blue 19 January 2013 03:54 AM

Yea but veggies are (presumably) a major part of your diet being vegan. If you are already buying lots of lettuce, tomato, onion, etc then it probably isn't hard to just use some for a sandwich. If you aren't, however, and don't use them as frequently I imagine they could go bad a lot faster (or more accurately, they'd go bad at the same rate but you'd use them slower).

Avril 19 January 2013 04:05 AM

There are some tricks for single people and perishables. One, if you only need a small amount of veggies, sometimes the grocer's salad bar can do the trick (8.99/pound, though--yikes!). I usually get my cold cuts and cheese in 1/4 pound amounts from the deli. You could theoretically buy a single slice of each (approximately 25 cents apiece). And I can buy a single hoagie roll from my grocery store's bakery (75 cents).

If I did this for making one sandwich like you get at Subway, though, it would cost me approximately $8. Not an arm and a leg, but not cheaper, either.

I almost never have a problem using stuff up before it goes bad, but that's because now I have had lots of experience and have made some wise investments in some cookbooks that tell you how to use up the odd half of a bell pepper and such. And I'm more realistic about what I actually eat. I buy a head of baby romaine rather than a big head of lettuce, for example. I buy fresh spinach by about the handful from the bulk bin. I open up the baggies of grapes and take a produce bag over there and pull out a small bunch.

But it's not easy.

Hero_Mike 19 January 2013 04:18 AM

Subway offers variety that you can't get, affordably, at home. In my former life I used to travel for work, and I picked up Subway, every day for 8 weeks, 6 days a week, so I've eaten more than my fair share of Subway. I didn't always get the same thing - not every sub tasted good with spinach or honey mustard, and I didn't always want hot peppers. The variety of sauces, meats, cheeses, and other ingredients is what makes it enjoyable.

I live alone and have found it difficult to eat all the perishable food I buy, because it's hard to predict my tastes and appetite ahead of time. I have found it is often more economical for me to buy a large quantity of something (say, 3 lbs. of asparagus, or a 5 lb. bag of baby carrots) at Costco and throw out what I don't eat, compared to much higher prices for smaller quantities. Again, I like variety, and while one week I may eat half a jar of artichoke hearts (taking a few with me for lunch every day), I will eventually reach a saturation point and not eat any more for a week or a month.

My co-workers and I have a few options for lunch in the town where we work - most are heavy and relatively unhealthy - and on the days where the brown-bag lunch is forgotten, never made or unappetizing, a plain old sandwich shop like Subway would be a happily seen alternative. The problem is that Subway isn't cheap and doesn't attract enough people. It also tends to get veeerry slooow during the lunch hour rush.

One of the best things at a Subway - at least before they opened for breakfast - was coming in right when they opened and getting a meatball sub, where the marinara sauce and meatballs hadn't been sitting there luke-warm for the whole day. With melted mozzarella, green pepper and onions it was like a pizza, only with meatballs, and better too.

Mickey Blue 19 January 2013 05:32 AM

I've also noticed, and it may be because I don't shop at one of those fancy upscale markets, that produce seems to have a highly variable shelf life, particularly 'leafy greens'. I've gotten some that gets all brown and slimy after just a few days and some that seems to stay crisp for weeks. Same brand, same store.

I assume this has to do with when it was actually picked but so far as I know there really isn't a good way to tell that.

I have no idea if upscale markets or farmers markets are better, but farmers markets aren't always open year round (logically given that they are supposed to be local or at least semi-local) and both are typically a lot more expensive than a regular supermarket for what I'm not always convinced is better merchandise (and either way would certainly drive up the cost of that home made food).

In general I totally agree that making your food at home will save you an arm and a leg over buying pre-made food and certainly food from a restaurant. However sandwiches, particularly 'sub' style, are one of the exceptions to that I think.

quink 19 January 2013 06:21 AM

My husband and I have gotten a pretty good veggie routine going between the two of us, but it's taken months to hit the right balance and it involves some meal planning. I eat around 8-10 fruit/veggie servings per day, so we do actually go through quite a bit. We plan the week's menu in advance and do a farmer's market run every weekend (ours is open year round, which means we get some imports in the winter, but they're generally still better quality and better priced than the grocery store). I try to prep everything as soon as I get it home so that it's cut, washed and easy to grab throughout the rest of the week. It's all organized in various containers inside the fridge (I do actually have stacks of assorted storage containers just to hold veggies), and usually I'll get a good week and a half out of the cut stuff. The only thing I'm still struggling with is lettuce, especially if I only want a small side salad or sandwich toppings.

My problem with making my own sandwiches would be the bread. I can almost never get through a loaf in a week before it gets moldy, and taking two slices out of the freezer for a single sandwich is a pain. I'm not a fan of subway after a couple nasty experiences at our local one, but when I'm craving a sandwich I'll happily hit the deli and pay the eight bucks for a really, really good one.

eta: I don't find the farmer's market to be any more expensive than the grocery store. Our usual veggie haul will fill up two big shopping bags and come to around $30 (including fruit, which is pricier). Item to item, the market is usually dead on or slightly cheaper. I'm not buying my groceries at Wal Mart or Superstore, though, so that could make a difference. The one time I tried to buy groceries at Wal Mart, the produce was pretty sad looking.

SatansHobbit 19 January 2013 06:36 AM

I got caught out early by MrsHobbit after telling her I had a half Footlong.

:confused: Maybe I shouldn't have overpoofed it?

Hummelcat 19 January 2013 02:28 PM

meal planning -- what's that?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by quink (Post 1704928)
My husband and I have gotten a pretty good veggie routine going between the two of us, but it's taken months to hit the right balance and it involves some meal planning.... We plan the week's menu in advance .... I try to prep everything as soon as I get it home so that it's cut, washed and easy to grab throughout the rest of the week....

I'm impressed! I'm getting better at using up the fresh veggies before I buy new stuff, but I'm still working on this concept of "meal planning". :)

Quote:

Originally Posted by quink (Post 1704928)
My problem with making my own sandwiches would be the bread. I can almost never get through a loaf in a week before it gets moldy, and taking two slices out of the freezer for a single sandwich is a pain...

I don't mind using a table knife and some muscle to wedge out a couple of slices of frozen bread every morning, but it's definitely not everyone's cup of buttered tea. One option might be to package the bread in several smaller portions for the freezer, and then thaw out one portion every few days that has only a few slices in it.

Lainie 19 January 2013 02:33 PM

I freely admit that my own troubles in using up fresh produce are partly due to disorganization and lack of discipline. :)

TurquoiseGirl 19 January 2013 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crocoduck_hunter (Post 1704727)
I've found that if you're making soup that isn't prepackaged, unless you've got a huge number of people you're going to need to freeze a bunch of it- you just can't easily make it in small enough quantities for only a couple of people.

This is part of the reason I have a deep freeze. I can make soup, or spaghetti sauce or whatever, and freeze it in smaller portions. Makes meal planning a little easier. Fortunately, I have the space for it. I know many people are not so lucky.

This is funny because I was going to stop at Subway on the way home from the grocery store. Because 1.) I only want one sandwich. and 2.) If I buy all the stuff for a BLT at the grocery store I am going to eat more than one sandwich at a single sitting. 3.) I don't eat sandwiches all that often.

Lainie 19 January 2013 07:15 PM

It's not even just perishables. I get black olives on my Subway sandwiches. If I buy a can of black olives, even one of the little tiny ones, it's enough for at least six sandwiches. I may not eat another 5 sandwiches like that within the time span in which I'd feel comfortable eating those olives (I'm squeamish about such things).

Esprise Me 19 January 2013 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hummelcat (Post 1704960)
One option might be to package the bread in several smaller portions for the freezer, and then thaw out one portion every few days that has only a few slices in it.

I've found that bread can last weeks, even months in the fridge, and it's ready to eat right out of the bag. Some people think it gets hard and unpalatable that way, but that discovery changed my life.

Quote:

Originally Posted by TurquoiseGirl (Post 1705025)
If I buy all the stuff for a BLT at the grocery store I am going to eat more than one sandwich at a single sitting.

Exactly. I can buy vegan desserts at Trader Joe's, or at this little cafe near my apartment. The price for a single cookie at the cafe is about the same as a box of mini ice cream sandwiches at Trader Joe's, but either one is going to be gone within a day or two. ;)

videoguy 19 January 2013 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Esprise Me (Post 1705050)
I've found that bread can last weeks, even months in the fridge, and it's ready to eat right out of the bag. Some people think it gets hard and unpalatable that way, but that discovery changed my life.

That's odd, because that is supposedly the worst place to store bread.

Question: I always store my bread at room temperature, but a friend always puts hers in the refrigerator. Which is better?
Answer: The counter is definitely the better place for your bread. Bread stored in the refrigerator will dry out and become stale much faster than bread stored at room temperature. For longer-term storage, you should freeze bread.
http://www.stilltasty.com/questions

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index....m-temperature/


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